Soundscape – New Final Version

This is my final soundscape. I made some changes to the eighth draft to better reflect my ideas. I tightened up a few of the timings and made some adjustments to some of the bird sounds so they are more clear. Then I decided to try adding some effects to the bird noises as well – I added some random delay pattens and some reverb to them. This combined with the EQ I had already applied created some interesting effects over the traffic noise.

The traffic noise gradually gets more and more distorted and the bird song becomes more and more effected also and then when the traffic noise is taken away, a strange sound emerges which is almost bird song but not as we would recognise it. I think this makes a statement about how the traffic noise is affecting our perception of other sounds.

I am more pleased with this version as I think it reflects my research better, and combines several differing approaches, including the more ‘truthful’ representation of a space, combined with the manipulation of sounds, not dissimilar to Lopez’s work. Throughout this process I have enjoyed trialling different ideas and creating new drafts of the soundscape.

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Revisiting My Soundscape 5

Having listened to the new drafts I have made, there are two that stand out to me:

and

https://soundcloud.com/milly-field-recordings/soundscape-revisit-3-seventh-draft

I like the gradual change in the fifth draft to making the traffic noise more intense, and I realised that I could try a different way of putting the soundscape together so that it would seem to gradually change, ending on the more intense, artificially manipulated sound. If I structure the soundscape so that rather than walking from the footpath (‘the track’) to the A27, I could structure it the other way round. This will be my next trial.

Revisiting My Soundscape 3

“The first half in particular suffers from homogeneity, partly because other textures are subsumed into traffic. It will be worth revising the first half, by making more recordings, and/or using some artificial construction to draw attention to peripheral sounds.”

Jeevan also noted that while the generative rhythms of the traffic are interesting, they go on too long. I noticed that myself listening again to my soundscape last week. My second idea is to incorporate more recordings, in particular bring in more ‘hi fi’, nature sounds, such as birds into the first half.

Revisiting My Soundscape 2

“Your underestimation of how loud traffic noise would be has actually led to an interesting aspect of the resultant piece: the dynamic perceptual relationship between it and other sounds. Whether you intended it or not, the generative nature of the ‘rhythm’ of the traffic is also quite satisfying.”

One of the things that Jeevan picked up on was the traffic noise actually creating its own rhythm. I think that this is an interesting place to start. Over the last few weeks, I have been considering what to do to make this more prominent and I came up with an idea of somehow artificially manipulating the traffic over the first half of my soundscape to make these generative rhythms more prominent, before returning to the second half of the soundscape which I would keep as it was.

Revisiting My Soundscape 1

Although I had watched this video, I noticed, from my feedback and through going back through my blog I realised that although I had done an extensive amount of research over a long period of time, I had not utilised the ‘network’ effect to its full potential and this has had an impact on my final soundscape.

My feedback suggest that I “take the challenge of improving the track as a prompt to experiment more with your creative and research processes.” So, to begin with, I’ve decided to go back through my research, in particular the listening and see if I can generate other ideas for my soundscape.

Soundscape (Final Draft 8th-9th November)

This is my final soundscape. I’ve uploaded it to my main CMC page here (Edit 7th Jan – as this is now simply a draft, I have re-uploaded this version of the soundscape and it can be heard here):

It is mostly similar to the soundscape I created in draft 2. I got rid of some sounds I didn’t like, including a couple of points where the wind noise was very loud and a few points where my handling of the mic was a little too obvious. A few ‘human’ sounds (people walking etc) have also been added.

I am quite pleased with how it’s turned out, despite the fact that it is quite different from my own vision. Actually going to Paradise Lane and starting to record there made me aware of just how noisy the traffic is, but this was further proved to me when I listened back to my recordings and found the traffic sound had penetrated everywhere I tried to record. This has led to a reasonably significant direction change, with the traffic noise playing a much more prominent role that I had originally planned for it. I think it’s difficult to hear a lot of what is going on and you really have to concentrate when listening to the soundscape to find the hi-fi sounds in it.

I have kept in mind the ‘listening body’ and have made sure a range of frequencies are accentuated at various points (like the bass while trains and cars go past). Mainly, I just made small changes to the mix in the edit room as I had done all previous mixes on headphones.

As I pointed out before, the ironic title ‘Paradise Lane’ is supposed to be thought-provoking: this place, is given the name ‘Paradise’, but is it really sonically paradise?

This piece is constructed as a sound walk down Paradise Lane. These are some things to listen out for:
00.00 – The A27, very close, some birds can be heard further away

00.24 – A train goes past in the distance

00.57 – Birds can be heard in the tree on the track

01.08 – Someone walks past

01.48 – A train goes past, this time closer, there are lots of trees and birds and a squirrel can be heard in them

03.04 – On the bridge as a train goes under it

04.12 – Heading towards the green, can hear birds

04.32 – A lady’s walking stick hitts the ground as she walks past

04.51 – A car passes the green

06.11 – The A27 can be heard in the distance, but also closer, at the bottom of Paradise Lane

06.28 – A train goes past, further away now

06.50 – Someone walks past

08.08 – Sirens in the distance

08.26 – A car drives up Paradise Lane

Field Recordings (2nd November)

On Sunday I went home to collect some recordings of Paradise Lane.

I started at the far end of Paradise Lane, which is a footpath that goes alongside a field. I then walked all the way back down towards the houses. I realised when I finished my recordings that I started and ended with the A27, which I thought was quite important and could be used as a possible theme in the piece. As you can probably tell from the photos, it was overcast and had been raining earlier in the morning so the ground was sodden (I decided to walk back up to the top of the path once I had gathered all my field recordings so that I could record my footsteps going back down.

Here are some photos of the area (click for bigger image):

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The A27 is behind the trees

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Capturing the wind rustling the leaves

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Looking down the track

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The bridge over the train line

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Waiting for a train…

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Looking up the track

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The horses’ field

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Recording my footsteps

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‘The Green’

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The bottom of Paradise Lane

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The view from the bottom of Paradise Lane (the A27)

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Now to start composing my soundscape…

Listening (31st October)

Following last Monday’s lecture, I looked into soundscape artist Janet Cardiff

I listened to the excerpts from Her Long Black Hair and read up on some of Cardiff’s other walks (no audio was available). Her soundwalks are interesting, they are almost like guided tours of places, but with an emphasis on the sounds. She ‘narrates’ them, and I imagine, if you were to do the actual walk, they would be very atmospheric. Listening to them, Janet Cardiff tries to create a personal connection between her and the listener/soundwalker – she asks questions and says how she feels at that point in the walk. The use of panning and layering is very important in her work and they really help build up the soundscape. One of the things I’ve noticed about her soundwalks is that she tries to give the listener some sort of historical context to the walk, through photos or locating the walk on historically significant sites. Personally, I don’t like the idea of narrating the soundwalk, but obviously for Cardiff’s pieces, it’s very necessary as her voice is guiding the listener. I might try arranging my piece as a sound walk, however, just to see what it would sound like. I like her use of layering and panning in particular because it sounds quite realistic.

http://www.cardiffmiller.com/artworks/walks/longhair.html – Her Long Black Hair

http://www.cardiffmiller.com/artworks/walks/bahnhof.html – The Alter Bahnhof Video Walk

http://www.cardiffmiller.com/artworks/walks/jena.html – Jena Walk (Memory Field)

Viewing (28th – 30th October)

Matt gave us some videos on soundscapes to watch, here’s my reflections on the two that stood out for me:

Listen: https://www.nfb.ca/film/listen#temp-share-panel

I thought this was a really interesting film. It gave an overview of a acoustic ecologist’s opinions on the soundscape. One part that particularly resonated with me was when David New recommended reducing the number of sounds in our life because there are too many in modern days. I had been up the hill to get some recordings that evening and it was quite quiet up there – although I could still hear the sounds of traffic and could make out the trains and a building site, it was at a much-reduced level. After spending about two hours up there, walking around, collecting recordings and watching the sun set, I adjusted to the quiet. When I walked back down to Guildford Park Road, it was still rush-hour. There were lots of cars going past, and an ambulance also went past with its full sirens on. Coupled with bright, artificial lights from headlights and streetlights, I experienced a sort of sensory overload. It did make me think about the impact of such loud sounds on my environment – even as I type this, I can hear the traffic loudly through my open window.

Whispering in the Leaves – an interview with Chris Watson:

Chris Watson said a lot of very interesting things in this interview. I like that he works in a home studio in his loft – he makes it clear that you don’t need a big studio to make good soundscapes (no pressure on me, then). He also says that the microphone is his instrument, his primary tool in his compositions. I’m going to try and think of my microphone like that, particularly at the weekend when I go to my parents’ house and make my Paradise Lane recordings. I also understood what he meant when he said he gets lost in a ‘sonic universe’ when he puts his headphones on and starts listening and recording. I’ve felt that on a couple of occasions of field recording, or even just listening back to my recordings.

Framework Listening Reflections (21st-27th October)

It seems like a while since I’ve posted, but I’ve actually been listening to a few podcasts and I wanted to publish my writings about them all together, so I’ve been writing this post for a while:

Framework #480

The first track is a study of different dialect and minority languages in Asia. It is interesting to hear and I love the idea that I can hear what’s happening in a country I have never been to and build a picture of it in my imagination. It is a very human-centric piece and as such it resonates, even though language is a barrier for me. After a while, you forget you’re listening to a person speaking and you just start listening to the sounds. I like the way the Hindu prayers (which are sung and instruments can be heard playing music) are slightly further back in the mix and the soundscape around it (mostly rain) is quite prominent, so you don’t lose sight (or hearing!) and just listen to it as music, but rather as sounds that are going on in a particular place.

Some of the recordings are so clear that you feel like you’re there and they have a wonderful crisp sound to them. I would like to have clear recordings in my soundscape (or as clear as my field recorder and skill set allow),

Framework #481

The track by Lopez stood out for me – again because his work is slightly more abstract. The birds mixing with other strange noises were really interesting, and at times they had an electronic sound to them. However, once again I feel that it is not the kind of soundscape work I would want to make. This does not detract from its value to be as a piece of work within the movement, but it’s not a route I see myself going down.

The first track on this podcast was interesting, it included audible human voices (speaking English) in what I imagined to be an office. It was a much more natural soundscape compared to Lopez’s contribution, but I didn’t really like it. I think it’s difficult to detach from human voices as they are such an important part of our experiences, particularly in terms of language. It would be a bit like trying to read this blog without seeing any of the words – language is so entrenched in our brains that it’s nearly impossible (probably impossible for me, at least) to switch off from it. Interestingly, a later piece had also had human voices in it, but it was clearly in a busy area and they were not so easy to pick out individual voices or words. I felt this worked better as the voices became a sound that wasn’t understandable in terms of language and therefore easier to detach myself from.

I liked the mix of different types of soundscape, there was more phonographic to purist to very abstract approaches and just about everything in between. One of the soundscapes had almost musical elements to them rather than just sounds, there were drones of high pitched noises interacting with the field recordings and it made it sound like a very unnerving ambient track!

Framework #483

The introduction was interesting, as the presenter pointed out. The intro was spoken by a group of children who are learning to sound out English phonetically, so have no idea what the words mean – they are therefore detached from the language and only listen to the sounds.

One of the first pieces is very unusual. There is a lot of processing and not an immediate story, rather some sounds all feeding into each other. There is some repetition of voices and phrases at the beginning although they are unintelligible. Later on in the piece there are sounds that are repeated. I think it makes it quite obvious that it’s been created by the artist and it seems almost clumsy in its execution. It’s got some really interesting sounds in it, but for me it’s too abstract and doesn’t seem to have a purpose. I’m going to go ahead and say I don’t like it.

Towards the end of this podcast, there was a more purist soundscape and I really enjoyed it. It was very nature focussed and has few man-made noises. It sounded great and I really enjoyed getting into it and imagining the landscape it was depicting.